Why you shouldn’t give your kids the vaccines that protect you

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BY Belinda Melinda Martin | 3/01/2019 04:16 PM PST

All new parents want to raise their kids in the best way possible. That’s just what we do, right? So, it’s only natural that you’ll start to wonder whether the vaccines that have helped you live this long are right for your children. The answer is no.


As you may or may not recall, you were given some vaccination shots when you were a kid and ever since then you’ve been told these shots help keep you alive. Well, hold your vaccinated horses. There are plenty of good reasons to be skeptical. For instance, when the shots were administered the doctor would count down from 3 but give the shot on 2 to fool you—that’s not very trustworthy. Afterward, your arm would hurt for a day or two and all of a sudden you don’t get infectious diseases anymore? Seems unlikely.


Separately, as a new parent, you are learning how challenging "playdates" with other young children and their parents can be. You're forced to stand at the park watching your kids play while you make awkward small talk. Well, when your kids are unvaccinated you'll have PLENTY to discuss, like chemtrails, the Illuminati and how Jesus used to ride dinosaurs from one end of the flat earth to the other.


If that's not enough I have two words for you: middle school. Should anyone have to go through that hormonal Hell? And don’t even get me started on the pains of being a high school student, which is a lot harder today than when you were going through it. Maybe you think they should live long enough to choose for themselves, but have you already forgotten what comes after graduation? Getting a job, paying bills and filing taxes. What's so great about that?


Look, I could go on. It’s not hard making up reasons to justify my beliefs. For instance, I think half and half tastes better than milk because it’s flexible enough to be two things in one. But ultimately, this is about you and the beliefs you want to make up for yourself—and I believe in you.

Lori GaffneyComment